Instructure Opens up About Diversity & Inclusion

At Instructure, we’re a uniquely awesome group of people working to create awesome every day. From the code we build, to how we look, to our Spotify playlists, we come from different backgrounds and experiences that make us each unique. And yet, when we put our uniqueness together, something amazing happens: We make software that makes people smarter.

But it doesn’t come without effort. We don’t accomplish great things just because we’re diverse; we also have the desire to accept and build upon each other’s differences. We know that the more diverse we are, the more diverse our ideas will be. This diversity makes us more creative, more effective, and ultimately a better company.*

Is Instructure diverse enough? No. We’re part of an industry and a geography that are both marked by dramatic imbalances in diversity—and we’re no exception.

Are we accepting and inclusive of one another? Not all the time. But we’re building toward it. And that’s why we want to talk openly about our plan to build a more diverse and inclusive company.

Today, we’re actively working to make Instructure more diverse and inclusive by:

  • Exploring issues and solutions with our Diversity & Inclusion Council. We have a team of 12 people focused on making Instructure a great place to work.
  • Being open. Our company was built on being open. It’s part of who we are. Open doors. Open office. Open source. Open is good and it promotes a culture that thrives on being accepting and transparent.
  • Providing benefits for everyone. We provide benefits to meet the diverse needs of our employees.
  • Emphasizing continuous learning. We’re all about learning, which is why we provide employees the ability to learn through tuition reimbursement, professional development, and leadership development.
  • Supporting our community. We sponsor and play an active role in encouraging diversity through organizations such as Chi Ladies Hack, EdTech Women, Girl Develop It, Rails Bridge, She’s Geeky, Women’s Leadership Institute, Women Tech Council, and others.
  • Talking the talk. We initiate and support ongoing conversations about diversity. We even conducted a study about the impact of corporate training on gender dynamics in the workplace.

How diverse is Instructure today? Here’s the data:**

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So where do we go from here? We’re committed to making Instructure more diverse and inclusive through these key initiatives:

  • Recruiting. We’ll include more outreach in our recruiting practices to attract more diverse candidates.
  • Training. We’ll empower employees to address unconscious bias through awareness.
  • Developing. We’ll create mentorship programs aimed at helping advance the leadership of minority groups within Instructure.
  • Supporting. We’ll continue to support community events and scholarship programs focused on diversity in the tech space.

By sharing these goals publicly, we’re living out our culture of openness. We’re making a statement about the importance of diversity and its impact on our business. And over time, it’s our desire to build an environment that is truly more diverse, and by extension, more inclusive, creative, and effective.

Keep learning,

Jeff Weber, SVP of People and Places
Heather Erickson, VP of Communications
Instructure's Diversity & Inclusion Council

 

*McKinsey & Company, “Why Diversity Matters” by By Vivian Hunt, Dennis Layton, and Sara Prince, January 2015.

**Gender data is global and ethnicity data is U.S. only. All data includes hires starting through January 1, 2016. This is not based on EEO-1 reports; however, ethnicity refers to the EEO-1 categories, which we know are imperfect categorizations of race and ethnicity, but reflect the U.S. government reporting requirements.